Thursday, January 28, 2016

The Story of a Great House


In October of last year, I got my first look at the David and Gladys Wright house in Phoenix.  I actually poked my lens through a fence to snap the above photo.  My first thought was that it was the most amazing Frank Lloyd Wright house that I had ever seen in person.  Little did I know that I would soon become even more familiar with the place.  Through a series of friends, I've had the pleasure of touring the house on several occasions.  (The above photo is take from west looking east.)


Over the past four years, news of the house has been circulating quite rapidly especially on my side of the city, close to the actual structure.  You see, the home was days away from demolition when a local businessman purchased it in 2012 and saved what is deemed one 20 of Wright's most important buildings of his career.  In fact, when the contractor hired to demolish the house saw it, he became concerned that an important FLW house would be destroyed in error and he called the city and the demolition permit was voided.  (The above photo is taken from the east side looking west.)

David Wright was the son of Frank Lloyd Wright and when he purchased the land he asked his father who was 84 at the time to design a home for him and his wife.

And, what a design he created.  The home sits like a coiled snake on the property rising upward to take in the spectacular views of Camelback Mountain.  In 1952 when the home was completed, there were citrus groves surrounding the home and from the windows you could see Camelback Mountain over a carpet of green from the trees.













The walk that encircles the house goes all the way up to the rooftop where the wide view of Camelback Mountain can be seen in all it's splendor.  That building just below is the guesthouse which was completed on the property a few years after the home was completed.

Come back tomorrow and I'll show you some photos from inside this fantastic architectural beauty.  

The theme for City Daily Photo bloggers on February 1 is
"A Scene from a Cafe or Coffee House.

13 comments:

Halcyon said...

I love the shape of the home. And of course it looks great against that blue sky!

Steve Reed said...

Wow! What an incredible structure. Thank God is was rescued! Does anyone live in it now, or is it open to the public?

VP said...

A quite strange building...

Karl Demetz said...

A real architectural beauty !

Lowell said...

It's hard to believe this was almost demolished! It's a fantastic place and an important part of our history and especially Phoenix's history. Thanks for your delightful photos!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Oh I will be back for sure Sharon I can't wait to see inside. OMG imagine if this had been knocked down, horrors! So who lives in it now, is it still the son and his wife?

William Kendall said...

Fortunate that it was saved. What a beautiful house!

RedPat said...

Such an unusual shape - I'm not sure if I would have realized that it was a FLW design. Glad it was saved.

cieldequimper said...

It's brilliant! You're lucky to have been able to visit!

LOLfromPasa said...

What a fantastic place and so glad it will remain in one piece. Great to see the view of Camelback too (referring back to my comment yesterday) - so all is well.

Catalyst said...

A tragedy averted by a contractor with a sense of history. Wow!

Jack said...

Wow! This is a pretty dazzling place. I'm not sure I would have identified it as a Wright house.

Kate said...

Jack is absolutely correct; it certainly does not have some of the characteristic FLW architectural touches.