Saturday, July 2, 2016

Navajo Code Talkers


After looking at yesterday's "Look Down" post, I decided that the statue that looks like a little dot in yesterday's photo and that I featured way back when I first started this blog deserved another look.  So, I drove down to Central and Thomas and took a few new photos.

It happens that this is the very first public art tribute that was made to the group of 400 Native American soldiers who worked as radio operators during WWII. Using their native language, they created an unbreakable way to communicate with other US units thus keeping locations and planned actions secret.

The statue was commissioned through the Heard Museum and Doug Hyde was the artist.  You might remember that I featured some of Dough Hyde's work in early June.

8 comments:

Bill Nicholls said...

Very fitting tribute to them

Andy said...

They were brave people in desperate times.

Lowell said...

Very nice. The code talkers were invaluable. I think I've got the movie but I haven't watched it yet. Maybe it's time?

William Kendall said...

It is impressive!

RedPat said...

I like this one - I like all his work you have shown! What a great story, Sharon!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Really like your perspective with this sculpture Sharon, here and the first time you featured him.

Kate said...

The Navajo code talkers were wonderful soldiers who did an invaluable service during WWII. Years ago I met one of them at an function in St Paul. I believe, correctly I hope, that Chester Nez who died in 2014 was the last of the Code Talkers. They are righty honoured for what they were able to do! Great sculpture!!

Jack said...

I read a book about the code talkers about a decade ago. They made a big contribution to the war effort.