Friday, May 28, 2010

Art Preserved

These sand cast panels were originally part of a mural on the side of a retail store that was torn down years ago. The panels were preserved and placed at the Biltmore Fashion Park Shopping Center so they could continue to be enjoyed. I’m at this shopping center quite often and I just saw these Monday evening. I don’t think they’ve put them in a place prominent enough for many people to enjoy them. In fact, I doubt many people have seen them at all. The artwork dates from 1963 and the artist is John Smith.

10 comments:

Kate said...

I'm glad that they were preserved and I agree that they should be displayed more prominently. I maxed the image and was interested in all the symbolism.

brattcat said...

At least they were preserved!

Kathy said...

Great post, Sharon. We need more preservation and recycling.

Memphis MOJO said...

Nice shot. Here's wishing you a great holiday weekend.

Magpie said...

They are lovely and wonderfully done. I agree that they need to be seen by more, but I'm thankful they were "recycled". Have a safe and happy weekend!!

Irina said...

Looks like the panels are telling a story about gods, woods and families. Great find.

Birdman said...

Now, I've seen them. Thanks!

JM said...

These are really cool! Glad they haven't been destroyed with building.

Tracy said...

Wow, I haven't been to Biltmore in years. Those are really gorgeous. So glad they didn't toss them aside.

Louis la Vache said...

This reminds «Louis» of how Safeway saved and moved some mosaics that had decorated the front of their Marina store in San Francisco.

That store, opened in 1959, became the prototype for Safeways built through the 1960s. Even today, any Safeway you see across the country with that curving roof is referred to as a "Marina" store.

The mosaics, depicting California life, originally were on the front of the store but were moved to the east side during a remodel in the 1980s.

Originally, Safeway was going to destroy the mosaics, but such a howl went up the company preserved them and relocated them.

Those Marina-style Safeways were light and airy and the design is very reminiscent of what Eichler was doing in the Bay Area with homes.